Traditional English Breakfast:How to make

Breakfast. The Full English. The Full Monty. A fry-up:

Put on your aprons and whip out your frying pans; fried breakfast became popular in Britain and Ireland during the Victorian era, and appears as one among many suggested breakfasts in home economist Isabella Beeton’s Book of Household Management. A classic English breakfast, commonly called a “fry-up,” is a great way to start your morning!

Heat the flat grill plate over a low heat, on top of 2 rings/flames if it fits, and brush sparingly with light olive oil.

 

 

Take care with the tomatoes

The tomatoes take about 12 minutes. Cut them lengthways, face the cut side upwards and sprinkle each half with salt. There’s nothing worse than a semi-raw grilled tomato, so make sure they’re cooked properly all the way through and a bit caramelised on top.

 

The Meat

The combination of both bacon and sausage is one of the essential elements to a full fry up. A simple pork or chicken sausage (like the banger) is ideal and the type of bacon is up to preference,but if you don’t eat pork or any kind of meat you can substitute it with green veg and peas or any meat kind of your choice.

Cook the sausages for 15 minutes, or until they’re cooked through. Heat 1 teaspoon (4.9 mL) of oil in a large pan over low heat. Once the oil is hot, add 2 sausages to the pan. After 10 minutes, turn the heat up to medium and cook the sausages for an additional 5 minutes. Once they’re done, either push them to the side of the pan to keep them warm, or transfer them to a hot plate.

“If you do have fried eggs, you can reduce the amount of fat on them by sliding the eggs onto a piece of kitchen paper before putting them onto the plate. You can also make your scrambled eggs in the microwave if you like, so that you don’t have to add any butter to the recipe. Remember to keep smashing them.

mushrooms

Take the stalk out and put them on a baking sheet the other way up to the way they grow with crunchy salt and pepper. You can also use button mushrooms.

 

  • For the mushrooms, brush away any dirt using a pastry brush and trim the stalk level with the mushroom top. Season with salt and pepper and drizzle over a little olive oil. Place stalk-side up on the grill plate and cook for 1-2 minutes before turning and cooking for a further 3-4 minutes. Avoid moving the mushrooms too much while cooking, as this releases the natural juices, making them soggy.

  • For the black pudding, cut the black pudding into 3-4 slices and remove the skin. Place on the grill plate and cook for 1½-2 minutes each side until slightly crispy.

  • For ‘proper’ fried bread it’s best to cook it in a separate pan. Ideally, use bread that is a couple of days old. Heat a frying pan to a medium heat and cover the base with oil. Add the bread and cook for 2-3 minutes each side until crispy and golden. If the pan becomes too dry, add a little more oil. For a richer flavour, add a knob of butter after you turn the slice.

  • Heat up 1/4 cup of baked beans for one or more for two to three people: Add your beans to the pan and cook them for 2 to 3 minutes, or until they’re hot all the way through. Use canned beans to save time, or make your own baked beans from scratch ahead of time. Once the beans are hot, move them to the side of the pan or to a hot plate.

    • Beans are a very common (and, often said, essential) part of a classic full English breakfast. You can add the beans to toast, eat them alongside the meats, or enjoy them on their own. Though if you don’t like beans, you don’t have to include them. The essential section of a fry up guide is a hot strong cup of tea and a bottle of vinegary, brown HP sauce, tomato sauce (aka ketchup), or both.
    • Whatever you choose to include in your fry up, enjoy the process from beginning to end.
    • These ingredients may vary depending on where in the Great Britain you happen to be and are a subject that is still open to (sometimes quite fierce.

 

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